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ICSC and UK embassy launch first battery swapping programme

MANILA, 11 Nov — The UK Embassy in Manila, in partnership with the iCSC, has recently unveiled the Philippines’ first electric jeepney fleet battery swap scheme. The project aims to help expand the eJeepney deployment, innovation and private sector partnership with local governments.

Learn more about it by reading UK Embassy’s press release below or you may visit their website by clicking here.

eJeepney Battery Swapping Programme

The British Embassy in Manila, in partnership with the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities (iCSC) has recently unveiled the Philippines’ first electric jeepney fleet battery swap scheme. The project is funded by the UK Government through the South East Asia Prosperity Fund. The project’s main purpose is for the expansion of eJeepney deployment, innovation and private sector partnership with local governments.  It  seeks to create momentum that leads to an investment tipping point, where 10% of total public utility jeepneys is replaced by electricity powered public vehicle applications within less than a decade. It will be a transition mainly driven by small and medium enterprise and individual investments in terms of fleet operations.

Emissions from the transport sector currently represent 30% of all pollution in the Philippines, and approximately 80% of air pollution in Metro Manila. Statistics show that every hour, motor vehicles in the Philippines consume 2.029 million litres of gasoline, 2,200 metric tons of carbon dioxide is pumped into the air, and four Filipinos die from dirty air.

In the United Kingdom, 21% of domestic carbon emissions are from transport, of which 92% are from road transport.  The UK has set a 4th carbon budget to reduce domestic emissions by 50% by 2025.To meet UK emission reduction targets, the transport sector needs to be decarbonised and a key element will be the move to ultra-low carbon vehicles, such as electric vehicles.  An electric vehicle powered with electricity generated from the current UK grid can emit up to 40% less CO2 than a conventional petrol vehicle.

You may view the iCSC press release on the project above, in their website.

As emissions in the transport sector are mitigated, they contribute to the solution of curbing dangerous climate change.  On 28 November, over 190 countries will meet at the UN Climate Change conference in Durban to map out the international climate change regime required to limit global average temperature rises to below 2 degrees above pre-industrial levels.  Making progress within the UNFCCC must be continued to build the requisite political will and confidence to deliver a single legally binding agreement that delivers confidence that action is being taken at the necessary levels to avoid dangerous climate change.

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